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Archive for the ‘Thoughts’ Category

There is no quality in this world that is not
what it is merely by contrast.
Nothing exists in itself.
[Herman Melville]

Peony

Four posts down from this one is a photo of my Saturn Sky sitting between two five-foot snow banks. There was a peony bush sleeping under the nearest snow bank. It not only survived sub-zero temperatures and deep snow, it also survived being trampled.

The winter temperatures and snow weight demolished my garage. While it was being rebuilt, the peony tried to sprout though the thawing soil but was repeatedly stepped on. I finally put a little fence around the damaged shoots and they were able to grow into a lovely bush. It finally bloomed two weeks later than usual, and its sweet scent filled my sun room.

The contrast between what I considered a dreadful winter and welcome summer is brought home to me in this delicate bloom. I’m glad peonies are the Indiana state flower.

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Mother’s Day, 2014

A sister is a little bit of childhood that can never be lost.
[Marion C. Garretty]

sisters

My niece, Katherine, took my sister (at the right in the photo) and I (at the left in the lace) to lunch for Mother’s Day. Yum. Then she took me to get flowers for my window boxes in the hope that it doesn’t snow again this spring. I also got a card from my children’s father, and a lovely bouquet from my friend Ray. I am blessed.

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Efforts

Katherine:

Jim Miller at Willowgreen publishing creates one-minute videos that are gems of encouragement. Do enjoy today’s message.

Originally posted on Willowgreen's 1-Minute Inspirations:

View original

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The story of women’s struggle for equality
belongs to no single feminist
nor to any one organization
but to the collective efforts of
all who care about human rights

[Gloria Steinem]

Shepherd's Moon

This Saturday is International Women’s Day. The photo is Ellen Robert’s display piece at the International Women’s Art Exhibition in the UPMarket Galleries (The Provision Market, Newport, Gwent) in Wales. Ellen spins, dyes, weaves and knits fiber, and she designed this lace poncho. The logo is her business identity, Shepherd’s Moon. The loom was built by her grandfather and used for many years by her grandmother—Ellen uses it now. The spinning is lace weight yarn the thickness of an eye lash. I am in awe of Ellen’s talent and skill. I have to add that she is also my oldest daughter.

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In the depth of winter
I finally learned
that there was in me
an invincible summer.
[Albert Camus]

Sky in snow

I can’t really whine and complain since there are millions of folks affected by the unusual severity of this winter BUT I know I am a summer person because I had to resist the urge to put on sandals and shorts just because it was above zero this morning. As you can see, my car is a summer thing too. I considered putting the top down when I took this photo but the trunk was frozen shut. There’s an azalea bush somewhere under that five-foot bank of snow. I hope it lives to bloom again.

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Brown-thumb alert

I want it said of me by those who knew me best,
that I always plucked a thistle and
planted a flower where I thought a flower would grow.
[Abraham Lincoln, birthday February 12, 1809]

Orchid

A friend who knows me well enough to know that my gardening thumbs are not green gave me this orchid for my birthday last November. I’ve always wanted an orchid but figured it would only last a week if consigned to my care. I’ve posted this to prove my lovely orchid is just as pretty after two and a half months!

Valentine gift advice: Buy her an orchid. It lasts longer than cut flowers and is so elegant (like her, I’m sure).

Side effect warning: I’ve developed an urge to read all of the Nero Wolfe books I can find (Rex Stout wrote over seventy). Both Nero W. and Rex S. were orchid lovers.

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I do not at all understand the mystery of grace—
only that it meets us where we are
but does not leave us where it found us.
[Anne Lamott]
TOBY

As I sat in the pet emergency room during the wee hours of last Wednesday morning, the thought struck me that Toby was the best example of God’s grace I’ve encountered in my earth-bound life. His love was freely given and required nothing in return. His quiet, gentle presence enriched my life.

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2013 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2013 annual report for this blog. Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 9,800 times in 2013. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 4 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

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The stockings were hung by the chimney with care,
In hopes that St. Nicholas soon would be there;
[C. C. Moore]

Argyle Christmas Stocking

If I could put a subtitle on this post, it would be, The Last of the Argyle. Thirty years ago, I knit an argyle vest for my husband. I found the technique so tedious and frustrating that, when I finished it, I swore I’d never knit another. I’ve known knitters, including my mother, who enjoy the technique immensely and who would be frustrated with the techniques I enjoy most. Such is the way with human beings.

Less than a decade ago, a group asked me to teach the intarsia knitting technique (as used in making argyle) so I designed another argyle vest. The request keeps cropping up so I keep knitting more argyle. I tell myself, it builds character.

Then came the ultimate request, a sock pattern that is argyle without a sewn seam. Here it is. Since I knew that I didn’t have the self discipline to knit a second sock, I made it into a Christmas stocking so I could say I was finished after only one. The accent lines are worked in duplicate stitch using metallic gold yarn. Although the pattern is worked to and fro, a wrap and turn avoids the need for a sewn seam.

Here is a Christmas gift for those of you who knit —  a free printable PDF pattern for knitting the sock. NOTE: This version of the pattern is a revision of the original. The heel instructions are altered. 

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One must be an inventor to read well.
There is then creative reading
as well as creative writing.
[Ralph Waldo Emerson]

iPad-apps

Since I live in relative solitude, my blog gives me a place to share things that one would normally share with a person in the same room. This is a, “You’ve just gotta see this…” post. The thought has crossed my mind that I’m likely the last to learn all of this, but I’ll share it anyhow. I’ll make bullet points of my disjointed thoughts.

  • The image is a screen shot of one of my iPad folders.
    • I’ve never seen non-Apple devices, but am confident that they have reasonable counterparts to this.
    • It is worth the effort to learn how to organize apps in folders so you can find your stuff easily on one screen.
    • The desktop image is either (a) my backyard or (b) a tourist stop near Cardiff, Wales (UK). HINT: I have no backyard.
  • About the first row of apps in the image—these are primarily text readers. iBooks reads books from the Apple store, Nook reads Barnes & Noble books, and Kindle reads Amazon books. The apps are free and many books can be obtained without cost as well. There are also sale priced books available from such sources as BookBub.
  • The second row of apps in the image—these are specialized readers. Audible (an Amazon company) is an audio book reader and not only reads books from Audible.com, but also reads non-Amazon books from iTunes. Overdrive accesses the local public library. Using my library card, I check out both text and audio books using Overdrive. GoodReader could also be called Knitter’sHelper. I use this for my PDF knitting patterns because it allows me to easily mark my place and make notes.
  • The third row shows apps from Blackstone. These audio books are well produced and are now available with a built-in player as apps—one book per app. I bought these in the App Store for reasonable prices. There are many choices. One of my favorite mystery writers is Louise Penny. Her books, set in Quebec, present characters in such depth and with such sensitivity, that they make me want to jump into my little roadster and drive to Canada in search of imaginary friends.

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